A Tour into the Wonderful World of Injection Molding with Plastics  

A Tour into the Wonderful World of Injection Molding with Plastics  

Where you aware that many plastic items you handle on a daily basis where generated through a production process referred to as injection molding? When your manufacturing needs have you googling, “plastic injection molding Chicago IL,” did you stop to think that the plastic lids on food jars were generated in such a fashion? Plastic parts required for industrial applications are not the only molded items. Lids for bottles and jars, plastic toys, and even certain types of musical instrument bodies can be more efficiently molded through this process. We’ll take a look at some of the pros, as well as the cons, of the injection molding process for the production of plastic items.

It’s a lot less Wasteful than many other Types of Production Processes…

The process of injection molding involves pouring the plastic directly into a mold. Only the plastic that is required for the mold is used. Many of the other production processes for plastic items will actually generate these items from a larger block of plastic. Much of the additional plastic that wasn’t used needs to be cut away when disassembling the generated pieces and constructing them. With injection molding, it’s pretty much just the plastic required for the job. Not only does this sort of manufacturing have a more positive effect on the bottom line, but is also much better for the environment.

The Process Itself is so Easily Repeated…

A mold moves in on a belt assembly line. A nozzle lowers down to pour the molten plastic material into said mold. The mold moves down the line, and after its contents dry, the plastic part is released so that the mold can be reused. When viewing the entire process, it is not hard to see how easily repeated it is. Easily repeated processes lend themselves better to production lines. It’s as simple as that. As a matter of fact, an assembly line is nothing more than a mere gathering of repeatable processes arranged in a particular order.

What about some of the Cons?

Perhaps one of the most important cons is the high upfront cost for setting up the mold. With 3D printing, a computer controlled device builds plastic parts using coded specifications that were designed on a screen. Setting the correct specifications for a mold that fits one’s needs can be quite time intensive. This is where the upfront costs really come in.

Additional Tools usually have to be Designed just to Construct more Molds…

If many molds will be required, tools for building the additional molds might be required. It’s like requiring a tool to more efficiently build the tools that you require. In many cases, this process causes the upfront costs to raise as discussed above.

Injection Molded is Still the Preferred Process for many Firms…

Injection molding is still the preferred production method for generating a lot of uniform plastic parts with very little waste. Once the upfront costs are handled, the production process is usually much cheaper than with 3D printing.